The Hurricane

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A powerful story about a boxer who is imprisoned for a murder he didn’t commit is The Hurricane. This movie begins with Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, played by Denzel Washington, being arrested for a fatal shooting. He is convicted and sentenced to life in prison. While incarcerated, he reflects on his arrest as a 12 year-old boy for stabbing a man in self-defense. Carter is locked up until his twenty-first birthday and he passes the time by learning the art of boxing. He developed a motive that became his focus for determination: “I want to be able to protect myself. I want my body to become a weapon.” (When I heard this I thought, he’s had enough trouble with weapons – why does he need another one?) Anyway, Carter eventually turns twenty-one, is released and becomes a professional boxer. He is close to achieving fame as a middleweight champion when several people are shot at a tavern and once again, he is arrested and sent to prison. During thi s second incarceration he writes the story of his life. A teenage boy named Lesra reads it and begins corresponding with Carter. They form a bond. And the Canadian family that Lesra lives with hires an attorney to appeal Carter’s conviction. This is a solid story with an outstanding performance by Denzel Washington, and it’s moving yet not a real tearjerker. I wish I had several pots of coffee to keep me awake when the middle of the movie slowed down to a crawl. The pace finally picked up and the ending was entertaining and inspiring. I give it a B rating.

This movie has been given an R rating by the MPAA

Although I am blind, I can appreciate a good movie as well as sighted individuals.
I rely more on a good story line than special effects.